“Like” to “Share” a Good Message?

In case you hadn’t noticed, the ever changing landscape that is Facebook made some updates  recently.  Like and Share are now one in the same. If you “Like” something, all your friends will know because it appears on your wall.

In February  Vadim Lavrusik of Mashable wrote,

Though users may now think twice about hitting the button, given how prominently it will appear on their walls and in their networks’ newsfeeds, it should ultimately increase traffic to publishers’ websites.

This is both helpful and challenging for online publishers. Now that the change has had a few months to take hold, the second guessing that Lavrusik mentions may very well also have taken hold.

What does this mean for projects trying to get their message out via blogs? Engaging content is essential. It’s not enough to just string words together for the sake of having a blog. Your words have to mean something to the person reading them, enough so they want to “Like,” (read: share) them with others.

Because the internet does not encourage long form reading, online writers face the challenge of telling the story in 500 words or less. Most readers will opt for the less. This means every word counts.  In some ways this is a good thing. It eliminates the use of superfluous language that already has a place on late night infomercials.

IMHO, one of the best ways to learn how to say more with less is to Tweet. How much can you say in 140 characters, including an abbreviated URL?

Using Twitter can help teach good word choice and which words are important. For a real challenge try Tweeting without the aid of acronyms such as the one used to start this paragraph, (IMHO=In my Humble Opinion).

Engaging content requires effective language. And effective language could encourage your readers to share your message with their friends resulting in more site traffic and more support for your project.

Write about what you like in your blog, but keep in mind what your readers will Like.

 

Special thanks to Social Media Delivered for their tweet that led me to the Mashable article above.

 

 

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